FDW 2018 at MX

13th August, 2018

When

13th August, 2018 08:00 am - 04:00 pm

Where

City Colleges of Chicago- Malcolm X College
1900 W. Jackson Blvd.
Chicago, IL 60612

Use hashtag #FDW2018 on social media to tell others about your experience.
See map

Subscribe & Share

Download   Grid   List

Monday, 13th August 2018

Time MX History Hallway 1100 Hallway NS 1106 Conference Center 1104 Auditorium 1101 1102 1103 3200 3201 3203 3204 3205 3300 3301 3302 3304 3309 3310 3311 4201 4204 4207 4301 4302 4303 4306 4308 4200 3206 6006 6007 4309 4305 4205 4105 4104 4103 3308 3307 3306 3305 3207 1107 Conference Center 1108 Conference Center 1100 Hallway EW 4203 4202
8:00 am Registration / Check-In
 Attend Link

Registration / Check-In

By:
Registration / Check-In Staff
August 13, 2018, 8:00 am to 9:00 am
Hall: MX History Hallway
Breakfast       Administrators Lounge
 Attend Link

Administrators Lounge

By:
Registration / Check-In Staff
August 13, 2018, 8:00 am to 9:00 am
Hall: 1102
                                                                                 
9:00 am     Opening Session and Welcome (Overflow)
 Attend Link

Opening Session and Welcome (Overflow)

By:
Brandon Nichols, David Sanders, Jennifer Alexander, Juan Salgado, Mark Potter, Rosie Inwang
August 13, 2018, 9:00 am to 10:00 am
Hall: 1106 Conference Center
Opening Session and Welcome
 Attend Link

Opening Session and Welcome

By:
Brandon Nichols, David Sanders, Jennifer Alexander, Juan Salgado, Mark Potter, Rosie Inwang
August 13, 2018, 9:00 am to 10:00 am
Hall: 1104 Auditorium
  Administrators Lounge
 Attend Link

Administrators Lounge

By:
Registration / Check-In Staff
August 13, 2018, 9:00 am to 10:00 am
Hall: 1102
                                                                                 
10:00 am           Administrators Lounge
 Attend Link

Administrators Lounge

By:
Registration / Check-In Staff
August 13, 2018, 10:00 am to 11:00 am
Hall: 1102
Brightspace Clinic
 Attend Link

Brightspace Clinic

By:
Registration / Check-In Staff
August 13, 2018, 10:00 am to 11:00 am
Hall: 1103
Chalk & Talk ... Is it the best model standard for teaching?
 Attend Link

Chalk & Talk ... Is it the best model standard for teaching?

This presentation will show the importance of the "chalk and talk" model in higher education. The goals are to explore additional teaching techniques through technology and web media, blended learning online, while demonstrating the chalk and talk model as the most effective tool .

By:
Sheila Wicks
August 13, 2018, 10:00 am to 11:00 am
Hall: 3200
Anti-Intellectualism in American Higher Education
 Attend Link

Anti-Intellectualism in American Higher Education

This presentation investigates the display of American anti-intellectualism in American politics, culture, and most specifically in American higher education. It argues that due to short-term, pragmatic, and commercial approaches in higher education, institutions have deviated from the ideals of liberal education. Focus has shifted to job-oriented training, thus affecting both the quality of education their graduates receive and their future. It analyzes the various political, cultural and social reasons to American hostility to intellect and intellectuals and also proposes some solutions. The presentation focuses on both sharing knowledge in this area and helping colleagues to reflect upon their own teaching philosophies and practices in the City Colleges of Chicago.

By:
Larry Su
August 13, 2018, 10:00 am to 11:00 am
Hall: 3201
CCC Student Wisdom Project: Learning from our First-generation College Alumni
 Attend Link

CCC Student Wisdom Project: Learning from our First-generation College Alumni

What motivates first-generation college students to enter college and persist to graduation despite obstacles? The CCC Student Wisdom Project is a qualitative research project exploring student success through extensive interviews with our first-generation college alumni. This session will: (a) present a model that captures the common themes for what motivated these alumni to attend college and persist despite obstacles; (b) discuss the common doubts, anxieties and roadblocks they experienced; (c) show how they successfully overcame the obstacles they encountered; and (d) discuss implications of the findings on both how we can better support students at the classroom level and the institutional level. This session will include video vignettes of alumni sharing their experiences and thoughts.

By:
Jennifer Meresman
August 13, 2018, 10:00 am to 11:00 am
Hall: 3203
Civic Controversies about Genetically Modified Organisms (GMO)
 Attend Link

Civic Controversies about Genetically Modified Organisms (GMO)

Faculty are expected to be role models for free speech and the dignified discussion of controversial topics. The topic of Genetically Modified Organisms (GMO) has drawn much controversy, but it's difficult to have an informed opinion without access to the scientific facts. This presentation will describe the research conducted about the safety and environmental consequences of GMO, focusing on the nutritional analysis, possibility of new allergens, and the fear of environmental escape.

By:
Laurie Erikson
August 13, 2018, 10:00 am to 11:00 am
Hall: 3204
Creating Collaborative Learning Cultures for Educators
 Attend Link

Creating Collaborative Learning Cultures for Educators

Educators perform best when working together in a professionally supported environment. Implementing a collaborative learning culture for educators can create strong faculty relationships. Such relationships are essential components to institutional effectiveness and faculty enhancement. Furthermore, developing such faculty learning communities helps to reduce teacher- burnout, enhances pedagogical design and reduces the archaic trail be error teaching of days past. This interactive session uses current learning trends, digital media, and your expertise towards developing a collaborative learning community for your campus. Get ready to share, explore, laugh and learn!

By:
Naima Dawson
August 13, 2018, 10:00 am to 11:00 am
Hall: 3205
Physicians Without Borders' "Forced from Home: An Interactive Exhibit on the Refugee Crisis"
 Attend Link

Physicians Without Borders' "Forced from Home: An Interactive Exhibit on the Refugee Crisis"

Forced From Home is a free, interactive, outdoor educational exhibition presented by Doctors Without Borders to raise public awareness about the experience of the world’s more than 65 million refugees and internally displaced people. Join us and learn about the many challenges people on the move encounter and the work Doctors Without Borders does to address their basic medical needs in a host of settings. Forced From Home is a free interactive exhibition designed to expose the realities of the global refugee crisis. More than 65 million people are now displaced worldwide, including refugees and asylum seekers whose lives are further endangered by policies that deny them protection. With experienced Doctors Without Borders aid workers leading the tour, faculty and student visitors engage with stories and materials gathered from refugee camps, sea rescue missions, and emergency medical projects around the world. This session will focus on the opportunities faculty and students of CCC have to experience this internationally renowned exhibit.

By:
Pam Nugent
August 13, 2018, 10:00 am to 11:00 am
Hall: 3300
Promoting Information Literacy through D2L
 Attend Link

Promoting Information Literacy through D2L

Critical thinking is a cornerstone of high quality education. In a world where information is readily available to students, understanding the differences between real and fake is more important than ever. This session addresses the need for information literacy to be incorporated into D2L course shells. Librarians from Daley and Kennedy-King will demonstrate how including information literacy tools into D2L course shells will increase students' critical thinking and analytical skills. These library tools will support student understanding and identification of information they read online and will give tips to decipher which news is real and which is fake. Additionally, instruction will be given on resources available in the library for both faculty and students.

By:
Adam Carey, Valerie Neylon
August 13, 2018, 10:00 am to 11:00 am
Hall: 3301
Rise of the Robots: Higher Ed and Automation
 Attend Link

Rise of the Robots: Higher Ed and Automation

In "The Future of Employment: How Susceptible Are Jobs to Computerization" Frey and Osborne (2013) predict that by the year 2030 nearly 50% of jobs in the United States will potentially be done by robots, computers, and other forms of machine automation. This forecast is often misrepresented and sensationalized as "the robots are taking our jobs!" But the question for educators should be whether we're preparing students to thrive in a widely-automated future by teaching critical and creative thinking, communication skills, resourcefulness, and compassion. This session will introduce attendees to current popular and scholarly discussions around automation, with an emphasis on the impact of emerging technologies on today's classroom, curriculum, and discourse.

By:
Diego Baez
August 13, 2018, 10:00 am to 11:00 am
Hall: 3302
Risk Management Insights: Assessing Your Risks
 Attend Link

Risk Management Insights: Assessing Your Risks

This presentation will provide information regarding the CCC Travel Policy, Student Accident Health Plan (SAHP), and things to consider regarding compliance. We will explore the requirements of traveling with students concerning chaperones and release waivers. In addition, the presenter will discuss the claims process and SAHP qualifications for students engaged in official activities associated with the class, laboratory, practicum or applied task.

By:
Ralph Passarelli
August 13, 2018, 10:00 am to 11:00 am
Hall: 3304
Students' Writing: What Descriptive Forms Are They Producing?
 Attend Link

Students' Writing: What Descriptive Forms Are They Producing?

This presentation highlights the number of students, particularly language minority and inner-city students, transfer their descriptive speech (i.e. their dialects) to their writing, which could often lead to negative, social, political responses from employers, educational institutions and the culture of power. The importance of prescriptive language use and bottoms-up approaches to addressing writing are discussed in class. Moreover, a taxonomy of actual students’ descriptive writing is highlighted with prescriptive equivalents. Ways to address students’ prescriptive use will be solicited.

By:
Ismail Hakim
August 13, 2018, 10:00 am to 11:00 am
Hall: 3309
Teaching useful mathematics
 Attend Link

Teaching useful mathematics

Very few of our students are interested in majoring in Mathematics. Almost all of them hope to receive something from their Math course that they can use in solving problems in other disciplines or in "real life" after they leave academia. This presentation will give a hands on introduction to solving Math problems using 21st Century tools instead of the slide rule or four function calculators that were used fifty years ago. Ideally every participant should have a smart phone and the room should be equipped with Wi-Fi internet access.

By:
Julius Nadas
August 13, 2018, 10:00 am to 11:00 am
Hall: 3310
The effectiveness of adaptive learning management systems (LMS) on student engagement, motivation and achievement in college mathematics.
 Attend Link

The effectiveness of adaptive learning management systems (LMS) on student engagement, motivation and achievement in college mathematics.

Educational institutions have invested heavily in Learning Management Systems (LMS) over the last decade. In particular, colleges and universities have purchased LMS to provide their students with online or blended-learning courses. Not only have the number of LMS installations increased, but the number of tools provided by LMS vendors and third parties have also increased. These tools allow faculty to manage their courses and to quickly publish course content. However, the provision of all these tools is not without some drawbacks. It also allow learners to access the course content through various audio-visual materials such as interactive tutorials, and assessment tools in addition to facilitate communication and collaboration outside of the classroom. Since LMS is significantly used in many higher education institutions, we need to determine its effectiveness on student engagement, motivation and achievement.

By:
Lynda Zenati
August 13, 2018, 10:00 am to 11:00 am
Hall: 3311
Why do my students do that?: An overview of student development theory and how it applies in the classroom
 Attend Link

Why do my students do that?: An overview of student development theory and how it applies in the classroom

Do you ever wonder why students act a certain way? Or how you can have more of impact on the students you teach? In this workshop, we will examine the college experience through a practitioner’s lens. We will look at ways to apply psychosocial and cognitive structural theory models in the classroom to address the needs of our students. These models specifically focus on person-environment interactions and look at where and how student development takes place. It is critical that we are equipped with the tools to meet students where they are at in their development and offer support to encourage persistence through to completion. This presentation will demonstrate how curriculum and teaching contribute to overall student development during these formative years.

By:
Vena Angela
August 13, 2018, 10:00 am to 11:00 am
Hall: 4201
              What Business Are We In? How The Library Can Help You Transmit Knowledge and Lead Students To Wisdom
 Attend Link

What Business Are We In? How The Library Can Help You Transmit Knowledge and Lead Students To Wisdom

We are constantly being bombarded and information. This session will help you understand how the Library can help you and your students on the road to knowledge. This presentation has two parts – showing what library resources are offered and discussing of what is the nature of our business. We hope to teach you how save time and effort when you make research assignments.

By:
Daniel Stuhlman
August 13, 2018, 10:00 am to 11:00 am
Hall: 4200
English 101 Eligibility Changes and the Impact on Other Disciplines
 Attend Link

English 101 Eligibility Changes and the Impact on Other Disciplines

Over the past two years, The English Discipline has made significant changes to its composition sequence district-wide. Some courses have been eliminated and others have been added to each college. Along with these changes, district office has chosen to enforce an existing procedure that has changed which students are 101 eligible. To help facilitate a necessary conversation around setting/changing pre-reqs and changing the existing procedures, English Faculty who have been directly involved in the restructuring of the course sequence and student placement will present information to aid in an informed, collaborative, decision-making process that will include stakeholders across the colleges and disciplines.

By:
Keith Sprewer
August 13, 2018, 10:00 am to 11:00 am
Hall: 3206
          Understanding Military Affiliated Students
 Attend Link

Understanding Military Affiliated Students

Best practices have been found helpful when working with veterans of war. This presentation will explore the impact of war, combat, and traumatic experiences that occur in the military. Presenters will discuss first-hand knowdlege of student experiences. It is our intent to help instructors and faculty members understand that homecoming for a veteran involves recreating oneself, and reaching for goals that may have been delayed by military service. American veterans have a long history of returning from war, overcoming personal and emotional hardships, and using their collection of unique experiences to become dedicated students, professionals, family members, and community leaders. It is our intent with these guidelines and best practices, to offer college and university staff and faculty important insights and suggestions that will help veterans come home, and achieve their academic goals and objectives. These guidelines and best practices are offered to assist in the journey toward veteran cultural competence

By:
Holly Possi, Marcus Williams El, Robert Thompson, Sean Herarty
August 13, 2018, 10:00 am to 11:00 am
Hall: 4105
Transitional Math and the PWR Act
 Attend Link

Transitional Math and the PWR Act

The Postsecondary and Workforce Readiness Act (PWR), signed into law in 2016, takes a student based and competency based
approach to helping students achieve college and career readiness. In Fall of 2017 the CCC Math discipline began designing pilot
programs that fulfill this law and allow high school students who complete these courses to enroll in college level math courses without
taking a placement exam. This talk is to let everyone know what has happened, what we've learned, and where we are headed.

By:
Rachel Johnson
August 13, 2018, 10:00 am to 11:00 am
Hall: 4104
    How To Build a Course In 10 Minutes and Course Conversion
 Attend Link

How To Build a Course In 10 Minutes and Course Conversion

While this session itself isn’t ten minutes, what you will learn can certainly be accomplished that quickly! During our time, we will look at the quick and easy ways to add content to your course, build a small quiz, set up your gradebook, and more! In addition, we’ll explore the workflow of adding and tweaking existing material brought over from other sources like Blackboard and content providers.

By:
Sean Fitzgibbons
August 13, 2018, 10:00 am to 11:00 am
Hall: 3307
  Role of Student Mentoring in a Successful S-STEM Scholarship Program
 Attend Link

Role of Student Mentoring in a Successful S-STEM Scholarship Program

Data will be presented to show the impact of mentoring on the National Science Foundation (NSF) funded S-STEM scholarship program. A Professional Learning and Service course (INTDSP 299-STEM) course was created for the purpose of student mentoring student scholar cohorts. 96% of student cohorts involved in the program have either graduated with associate degrees or transferred to 4-year institutions. Ten student scholars graduated with bachelor's degrees in STEM related fields. The specifics of the program will be discussed and faculty engagement with the project will be discussed.

By:
Mohamed El-Maazawi
August 13, 2018, 10:00 am to 11:00 am
Hall: 3305
Experience bio-diverse southern Illinois in multi-day field studies. Outdoor, Environmental, Recreational, Experiential.
 Attend Link

Experience bio-diverse southern Illinois in multi-day field studies. Outdoor, Environmental, Recreational, Experiential.

Nearly seventy years old Touch of Nature Environmental Center has been a leader in the fields of Outdoor, Experiential, Environmental, Therapeutic, Adventure and Challenge Education and Wilderness Therapy. The vision of Southern Illinois University Carbondale president Delyte Morris as the experiential facet of the University focusing on the strengths of the regional landscape and the power of camp and group experience to educate and heal. Dr. William Freeberg the first to have a doctorate in Outdoor Education started Camp Little Giant, the first associated with a university for people with disabilities or as Dr. Freeberg coined “Special Populations”. With others, his worked started the Special Olympics. First high ropes challenge course outside Outward Bound. First orienteering competition in North America, Designated a National Environmental Education Landmark in 1972 by National Park Service. Peace Corps, Association of Experiential Education, American Camping Association, Wilderness Education Association, and many, many more had early associations here.

Today we base our work on 3,100 acres of unglaciated forest sitting on the waters of a National Wildlife Refuge, nestled amongst a State Park, Wilderness Areas, and National Forest. We work with all populations from across the nation and the globe. Utilized by the University for wildlife, forestry, aquaculture and other research, SIUC students get hands on experience through on campus departments and as educators and facilitators working on site in a wide variety of programs.
Join us for experience based programs designed for your group and let us be your doorway to beautiful and biodiverse Southern Illinois!

By:
Bryn Blackburn, Steve Gariepy
August 13, 2018, 10:00 am to 11:00 am
Hall: 3207
         
11:00 am   Resource Fair
 Attend Link

Resource Fair

By:
Registration / Check-In Staff
August 13, 2018, 11:00 am to 12:00 pm
Hall: 1100 Hallway NS
  English Discipline Meeting
 Attend Link

English Discipline Meeting

By:
Registration / Check-In Staff
August 13, 2018, 11:00 am to 12:00 pm
Hall: 1104 Auditorium
  Administrators Lounge
 Attend Link

Administrators Lounge

By:
Registration / Check-In Staff
August 13, 2018, 11:00 am to 12:00 pm
Hall: 1102
Brightspace Clinic
 Attend Link

Brightspace Clinic

By:
Registration / Check-In Staff
August 13, 2018, 11:00 am to 12:00 pm
Hall: 1103
Addiction Studies/Social Services Discipline Meeting
 Attend Link

Addiction Studies/Social Services Discipline Meeting

By:
Registration / Check-In Staff
August 13, 2018, 11:00 am to 12:00 pm
Hall: 3200
Africana Studies Discipline Meeting
 Attend Link

Africana Studies Discipline Meeting

By:
Registration / Check-In Staff
August 13, 2018, 11:00 am to 12:00 pm
Hall: 3201
Architecture Discipline Meeting
 Attend Link

Architecture Discipline Meeting

By:
Registration / Check-In Staff
August 13, 2018, 11:00 am to 12:00 pm
Hall: 3203
Business Discipline Meeting
 Attend Link

Business Discipline Meeting

By:
Registration / Check-In Staff
August 13, 2018, 11:00 am to 12:00 pm
Hall: 3204
Chemistry Discipline Meeting
 Attend Link

Chemistry Discipline Meeting

By:
Registration / Check-In Staff
August 13, 2018, 11:00 am to 12:00 pm
Hall: 3205
Cosmetology Discipline Meeting
 Attend Link

Cosmetology Discipline Meeting

By:
Registration / Check-In Staff
August 13, 2018, 11:00 am to 12:00 pm
Hall: 3300
Criminal Justice Discipline Meeting
 Attend Link

Criminal Justice Discipline Meeting

By:
Registration / Check-In Staff
August 13, 2018, 11:00 am to 12:00 pm
Hall: 3301
Culinary, Baking, & Hospitality Discipline Meeting
 Attend Link

Culinary, Baking, & Hospitality Discipline Meeting

By:
Registration / Check-In Staff
August 13, 2018, 11:00 am to 12:00 pm
Hall: 3302
Dental Hygiene
 Attend Link

Dental Hygiene

By:
Registration / Check-In Staff
August 13, 2018, 11:00 am to 12:00 pm
Hall: 3304
History Discipline Meeting
 Attend Link

History Discipline Meeting

By:
Registration / Check-In Staff
August 13, 2018, 11:00 am to 12:00 pm
Hall: 3309
Humanities Discipline Meeting
 Attend Link

Humanities Discipline Meeting

By:
Registration / Check-In Staff
August 13, 2018, 11:00 am to 12:00 pm
Hall: 3310
Manufacturing Discipline Meeting
 Attend Link

Manufacturing Discipline Meeting

By:
Registration / Check-In Staff
August 13, 2018, 11:00 am to 12:00 pm
Hall: 3311
Paralegal Discipline Meeting
 Attend Link

Paralegal Discipline Meeting

By:
Registration / Check-In Staff
August 13, 2018, 11:00 am to 12:00 pm
Hall: 4201
Transportation, Distribution, & Logistics Discipline Meeting
 Attend Link

Transportation, Distribution, & Logistics Discipline Meeting

By:
Registration / Check-In Staff
August 13, 2018, 11:00 am to 12:00 pm
Hall: 4204
Radiography Discipline Meeting
 Attend Link

Radiography Discipline Meeting

By:
Registration / Check-In Staff
August 13, 2018, 11:00 am to 12:00 pm
Hall: 4207
Sociology and Anthropology Discipline Meeting
 Attend Link

Sociology and Anthropology Discipline Meeting

By:
Registration / Check-In Staff
August 13, 2018, 11:00 am to 12:00 pm
Hall: 4301
Political Science Discipline Meeting
 Attend Link

Political Science Discipline Meeting

By:
Registration / Check-In Staff
August 13, 2018, 11:00 am to 12:00 pm
Hall: 4302
Biology Discipline Meeting
 Attend Link

Biology Discipline Meeting

By:
Registration / Check-In Staff
August 13, 2018, 11:00 am to 12:00 pm
Hall: 4303
Mathematics Discipline Meeting
 Attend Link

Mathematics Discipline Meeting

By:
Registration / Check-In Staff
August 13, 2018, 11:00 am to 12:00 pm
Hall: 4306
Speech Discipline Meeting
 Attend Link

Speech Discipline Meeting

By:
Registration / Check-In Staff
August 13, 2018, 11:00 am to 12:00 pm
Hall: 4308
Nursing Discipline Meeting
 Attend Link

Nursing Discipline Meeting

By:
Registration / Check-In Staff
August 13, 2018, 11:00 am to 12:00 pm
Hall: 4200
Child Development Discipline Meeting
 Attend Link

Child Development Discipline Meeting

By:
Registration / Check-In Staff
August 13, 2018, 11:00 am to 12:00 pm
Hall: 3206
Theater Discipline Meeting
 Attend Link

Theater Discipline Meeting

By:
Registration / Check-In Staff
August 13, 2018, 11:00 am to 12:00 pm
Hall: 6006
World Languages Discipline Meeting
 Attend Link

World Languages Discipline Meeting

By:
Registration / Check-In Staff
August 13, 2018, 11:00 am to 12:00 pm
Hall: 6007
Studio Arts Discipline Meeting
 Attend Link

Studio Arts Discipline Meeting

By:
Registration / Check-In Staff
August 13, 2018, 11:00 am to 12:00 pm
Hall: 4309
Library Discipline Meeting
 Attend Link

Library Discipline Meeting

By:
Registration / Check-In Staff
August 13, 2018, 11:00 am to 12:00 pm
Hall: 4305
Psychology Discipline Meeting
 Attend Link

Psychology Discipline Meeting

By:
Registration / Check-In Staff
August 13, 2018, 11:00 am to 12:00 pm
Hall: 4205
Music Discipline Meeting
 Attend Link

Music Discipline Meeting

By:
Registration / Check-In Staff
August 13, 2018, 11:00 am to 12:00 pm
Hall: 4105
Mortuary Science Discipline Meeting
 Attend Link

Mortuary Science Discipline Meeting

By:
Registration / Check-In Staff
August 13, 2018, 11:00 am to 12:00 pm
Hall: 4104
College Success Discipline Meeting
 Attend Link

College Success Discipline Meeting

By:
Registration / Check-In Staff
August 13, 2018, 11:00 am to 12:00 pm
Hall: 4103
      ESL Discipline Meeting
 Attend Link

ESL Discipline Meeting

By:
Registration / Check-In Staff
August 13, 2018, 11:00 am to 12:00 pm
Hall: 3305
Computer Information Systems Discipline Meeting
 Attend Link

Computer Information Systems Discipline Meeting

By:
Registration / Check-In Staff
August 13, 2018, 11:00 am to 12:00 pm
Hall: 3207
      Physics and Engineering Discipline Meeting
 Attend Link

Physics and Engineering Discipline Meeting

By:
Registration / Check-In Staff
August 13, 2018, 11:00 am to 12:00 pm
Hall: 4203
Respiratory Care Discipline Meeting
 Attend Link

Respiratory Care Discipline Meeting

By:
Registration / Check-In Staff
August 13, 2018, 11:00 am to 12:00 pm
Hall: 4202
12:00 pm   Resource Fair
 Attend Link

Resource Fair

By:
Registration / Check-In Staff
August 13, 2018, 12:00 pm to 1:00 pm
Hall: 1100 Hallway NS
Lunch     Administrators Lounge
 Attend Link

Administrators Lounge

By:
Registration / Check-In Staff
August 13, 2018, 12:00 pm to 1:00 pm
Hall: 1102
Brightspace Clinic
 Attend Link

Brightspace Clinic

By:
Registration / Check-In Staff
August 13, 2018, 12:00 pm to 1:00 pm
Hall: 1103
                                                                      Lunch Lunch      
1:00 pm           Administrators Lounge
 Attend Link

Administrators Lounge

By:
Registration / Check-In Staff
August 13, 2018, 1:00 pm to 2:00 pm
Hall: 1102
Brightspace Clinic
 Attend Link

Brightspace Clinic

By:
Registration / Check-In Staff
August 13, 2018, 1:00 pm to 2:00 pm
Hall: 1103
Online Human Touch ( Training & Support ) a framework for faculty
 Attend Link

Online Human Touch ( Training & Support ) a framework for faculty

According to Drexel University, Growth in Online Education exceeds Higher Education in US. The OHT model (Online Human Touch Model) was created to provide a framework for faculty to enhance their communication, community, and data driven components for teaching . Hence demonstrating strategies to increase retention and reduce attrition rates.

By:
Sheila Wicks
August 13, 2018, 1:00 pm to 2:00 pm
Hall: 3200
City Colleges of Chicago Grading System
 Attend Link

City Colleges of Chicago Grading System

The City Colleges of Chicago (ccc) uses the most traditional grading system: A, B, C, D and F. With this grading scale, the students who get 90% and 99.99% both earn A grades and the students who get 80% and 89.99% both earn B grades. Is that fair? A plus-and-minus grading system will reflect better quantitative student learning outcomes. Is this something that the City Colleges of Chicago should consider? Why or why not? The purpose of this session is to critically examine the grading system and bring our findings to the Powers that Be.

By:
Augusthy Kulakkattolickal
August 13, 2018, 1:00 pm to 2:00 pm
Hall: 3201
Facilitating Assignment Design Charrettes: Sharing Resources, Tools, and Practices
 Attend Link

Facilitating Assignment Design Charrettes: Sharing Resources, Tools, and Practices

Effective assessment, as we know from decades of experience, is not only about measurement; it is about building a culture of evidence and improvement. That means paying attention to the needs of stakeholders, especially faculty, and providing relevant support and development opportunities. Evidence from the work that students do in their courses is proving especially powerful for improving student learning but this is only true when the assignments and tasks that faculty require of students are clearly and explicitly aligned with designated learning outcomes. To facilitate tight alignment between assignments, evaluative criteria, and student learning, faculty are coming together collectively to work on assignment design. This session will feature current work happening around assignment design and highlight the ways that a focus on assignments as assessments can more deeply engage faculty and also strengthen student learning and success.

By:
Gianina Baker
August 13, 2018, 1:00 pm to 2:00 pm
Hall: 3203
From Blackboard to Brightspace: Change. Change! Change?
 Attend Link

From Blackboard to Brightspace: Change. Change! Change?

By:
Chris Sabino, Jennifer Asimow, Morgan Halstead, Sarah Ladino
August 13, 2018, 1:00 pm to 2:00 pm
Hall: 3204
Global Resources for Teaching and Learning: What Do You Need?
 Attend Link

Global Resources for Teaching and Learning: What Do You Need?

By:
Abbey Newman, Esther Peters, Natalie Arsenault, Thomas Maguire
August 13, 2018, 1:00 pm to 2:00 pm
Hall: 3205
Physics at Truman College: Tenure Portfolio
 Attend Link

Physics at Truman College: Tenure Portfolio

Physics classes at Harry S Truman College aim to develop useful technical skills in addition to a strong foundation in physics. We offer the full series of both STEM and non-STEM introductory classes as well a conceptual physics class. STEM students are trained rigorously in the necessary mathematics and gain experience using state of the art laboratory experiments. A math readiness exam is administered at the beginning of each semester. We have found a significant correlation between the results of this exam and final grade, even though this exam has no bearing on the final grade. Therefore, we can easily identify students in need and support them accordingly beginning on the first week of class. Additionally, Truman physics students score well on the Force Concept Inventory (FCI), a widely used conceptual test of Newtonian ideas. The average FCI gain for my classes of 0.42 for regular semester courses is much higher than a traditional classroom gain of 0.22 and comparable to the gain of 0.39 achieved in modern interactive engagement classrooms. Over the last three years we have outfitted our labs with modern data acquisition equipment and many completely new experiments in Kinematics, Collisions, Conservation of Momentum, Newton's Laws, Simple Harmonic Motion, DC circuits, and AC circuits. Additionally, we have introduced computer based numerical projects which are traditionally not part of an introductory physics curriculum. These projects complement the traditional curriculum and give students experience writing their own computer code. During this time, our enrollment has increased threefold.

By:
Joe Farrell
August 13, 2018, 1:00 pm to 2:00 pm
Hall: 3300
Researching Chicago: Developing a Usable Chicago Studies Research Guide for CCC students
 Attend Link

Researching Chicago: Developing a Usable Chicago Studies Research Guide for CCC students

Institutions such as DePaul University and the University of Chicago have organized resources for conducting research in Chicago studies. While some of these online resources are readily available to the public, developing a research guide for CCC students to explore Chicago would be a worthwhile endeavor. This presentation has two goals. The first goal is to share current work towards developing such a guide in an English 102 course: a mini-research project called the Community Profile assignment, in which students conduct SWOT analyses of their own neighborhoods. The assignment encourages use of both primary and online data sources. The second goal of the presentation is to engage faculty and staff in discussion towards designing a usable student-friendly research guide that can be used not only in English 102, but in courses across the curriculum.

By:
Rosie L. Banks
August 13, 2018, 1:00 pm to 2:00 pm
Hall: 3301
Solving Long-Term Knowledge Retention Problem by A STEM Learning-Level-Enhancement Methodology
 Attend Link

Solving Long-Term Knowledge Retention Problem by A STEM Learning-Level-Enhancement Methodology

In this presentation, an innovative STEM Learning-Level-Enhancement (LLE) Methodology of building mental schemata is presented. It is designed to help students to construct common question types and corresponding common procedures and subsequently relate these to master formula or concept at the higher levels under the guideline of a working STEM taxonomy of learning and teaching. Students’ lack of sufficient abstract thinking ability, problem solving ability, and long-term knowledge retention are three typical problems identified among the STEM educators. All these problems might be mainly caused by one of the common methods of teaching students detailed step-by-step procedures only without making connections to higher abstraction levels of common question types, common procedures, master formula, and concepts. This LLE methodology is specially designed to solve these problems. Both the data and the long-term knowledge retention study of a Calculus II class on the effectiveness of this LLE approach will be presented and discussed. Even though this LLE methodology is theoretically applicable to most STEM fields, more well designed and comprehensive studies will be needed in the future in order to verify its validity scope within each field. If it is confirmed further to be widely applicable to most of the STEM fields, then this LLE methodology will eventually help to enhance the overall STEM educational quality.

By:
Ming-Jer Wang
August 13, 2018, 1:00 pm to 2:00 pm
Hall: 3302
Subjective to Objective Grading: How to Quantitatively and Qualitatively Assess our Students
 Attend Link

Subjective to Objective Grading: How to Quantitatively and Qualitatively Assess our Students

In this session participants will understand how to finalize grades “fairly” in ways that decrease students’ “feelings” about how they were graded and administrative paperwork. With this presentation, our professors at KKC will be more in tune on how to grade students more objectively and righteously; this includes understanding how to academically assess students based on the students’ quantitative and qualitative data. For so long educators have heard the nagging calls of students complaining about their final grade, feeling as if they were graded unfairly or there were points not added somewhere that could have bumped their 88% to a 90%. More often than not, these complaints trickle into the early reigns of the next semester, which can get in the way of the time needed for the professors’ current students.

By:
Taneka Douglas
August 13, 2018, 1:00 pm to 2:00 pm
Hall: 3304
The English Language Arts Teaching Cycle
 Attend Link

The English Language Arts Teaching Cycle

Teachers often assume that our students have the ability understand the tools (grammar concepts and mechanics) and know how to use them. This workshop will equip English Teachers with information that will ensure that students will have the solid foundation in ELA necessary to become proficient in regards to no just reading but writing as well. The purpose of this presentation is to show teachers how to teach all the English Language Arts Components together.

By:
Lakeisha Young
August 13, 2018, 1:00 pm to 2:00 pm
Hall: 3309
Use Poems and Photography in Qualitative Research
 Attend Link

Use Poems and Photography in Qualitative Research

Use of photography and poetry offer a way for participants to express lived experiences through a visual and written means of self-expression. These forms of data collection can provide a rich, thick description of those often overlying on the peripherals of society. Traditional means of qualitative research such as interview and observation can at times create a barrier between the researcher and the participants because of the face-to-face interaction. Participants may be uncomfortable expressing authentic feeling during a formal interview process. By offering participants the opportunity to personally select descriptive photographs and articulate expression in their own voice through poetry, an authentic expression occurs.

By:
Carolyn Stevenson
August 13, 2018, 1:00 pm to 2:00 pm
Hall: 3310
Using Process Oriented Guided Inquiry Learning (POGIL) to Improve Student Success in General Chemistry
 Attend Link

Using Process Oriented Guided Inquiry Learning (POGIL) to Improve Student Success in General Chemistry

This session will address past and future applications of Process Oriented Guided Inquiry Learning (POGIL) to improve student learning and course outcomes in General Chemistry. POGIL is an instructional method that uses disciplinary context to teach both content and skills that are essential for long term success in STEM. Although POGIL started in chemistry, it has been expanded and applied in all of the STEM disciplines. This presentation will discuss the application of POGIL in General Chemistry at Harold Washington College, where it both boosted learning in chemistry (as evidenced by 12 percentile increase in ACS exam scores) and student success (as evidenced by a 14 percentage point increase in successful completion of the course). These results will be discussed in depth and put into context with the latest understanding of POGIL's impacts from the educational literature. Future directions for using POGIL will be discussed in an interactive brainstorming question and answer session.

By:
Thomas Higgins
August 13, 2018, 1:00 pm to 2:00 pm
Hall: 3311
                  Building Community: Creating a culture of collaboration between Faculty and Student Services to increase student engagement
 Attend Link

Building Community: Creating a culture of collaboration between Faculty and Student Services to increase student engagement

As a community college, we want to build the “community” at Malcolm X College. We are a commuter campus and our students come and go each day, many focused solely on attending class. Research suggest that students who engage in activities beyond the classroom are retained at a higher rate. Many of the student activities at Malcolm X College are poorly attended. Traditionally our Student Services Department and Faculty often work independently to increase student engagement. We have found that when faculty and student services do collaborate, student participation does increase. Faculty have the most consistent interactions with students as they see and communicate with them on a regular basis. We believe Faculty are uniquely positioned to partner with Student Services to increase student engagement in campus-wide activities. During this presentation, we will review research on student engagement, discuss our collaborative experience working to increase student engagement and lead attendees in small group brainstorming sessions. We will share specific examples of how robust collaboration between Faculty and Student Services can increase student engagement and program participation.

By:
Mary Lane
August 13, 2018, 1:00 pm to 2:00 pm
Hall: 3206
          Teaching the Very Foreign: Central Asian history for building a knowledge and inquiry skills ladder
 Attend Link

Teaching the Very Foreign: Central Asian history for building a knowledge and inquiry skills ladder

Central Eurasia is far from the knowledge and experience of most college students, but weaving knowledge about various Central Eurasia-related topics into internationally-oriented coursework allows students to enhance their inquiry skills and to use engagement with very unfamiliar places and societies to build their ability to base analysis on new information. This talk will present several examples from Central Asia past and present: Russia’s conquest of Kazakh nomads; collectivization of Uzbek cotton growers; and present-day Kyrgyz bride kidnapping. The talk/discussion then turns toward enhancing students’ ability to ask questions that allow for deeper inquiry, and that begin to think through comparisons to more familiar topics that may help to ground an analysis of something very unfamiliar. The mode of presentation will start with a short lecture and then turn to group discussion and interaction for turning new cultural information into the basis for inquiry and analysis.

By:
Marianne Kamp
August 13, 2018, 1:00 pm to 2:00 pm
Hall: 4105
Why Are We Here? Perspectives on the Goals of Education
 Attend Link

Why Are We Here? Perspectives on the Goals of Education

Through the use of source material and stimulating discussion, the session is designed to encourage faculty to think deeply, discuss mindfully, and thoughtfully reconsider their own approach, perspective, and philosophy of the purposes of education and the goals that they pursue in the classroom and the objectives they believe an institution of higher education should pursue as well. The presenters will provide attendees with four passages from prominent philosophers, historians, and commentators that present diverse perspectives on the purposes of education. After reviewing the selections, the attendees will be broken up into groups to discuss the passages using questions provided to them. Following the discussion, the groups will be invited back into the full discussion group to argue in favor of one of the perspectives, whether they agree with it or not. The purpose behind this exercise is to inspire attendees to consider perspectives that are not necessarily their own. The session will conclude with a full group activity and a “what did we learn” discussion.

By:
Jonathan Helwink
August 13, 2018, 1:00 pm to 2:00 pm
Hall: 4104
  TurnItIn Updates and Enhancements
 Attend Link

TurnItIn Updates and Enhancements

Join Turnitin to discuss the upcoming enhancements to the integration with D2L including dashboard updates, pushing grades to the D2L gradebook, and conducting peer reviews using PeerMark within D2L.

By:
Stephanie Stocks
August 13, 2018, 1:00 pm to 2:00 pm
Hall: 3308
How To Build a Course In 10 Minutes and Course Conversion
 Attend Link

How To Build a Course In 10 Minutes and Course Conversion

While this session itself isn’t ten minutes, what you will learn can certainly be accomplished that quickly! During our time, we will look at the quick and easy ways to add content to your course, build a small quiz, set up your gradebook, and more! In addition, we’ll explore the workflow of adding and tweaking existing material brought over from other sources like Blackboard and content providers.

By:
Sean Fitzgibbons
August 13, 2018, 1:00 pm to 2:00 pm
Hall: 3307
Introduction to SAM
 Attend Link

Introduction to SAM

To introduce faculty teaching CIS 120/122/123/145 to the SAM platform. The SAM platform is designed as a teaching supplement used by faculty to provide students with a hands on learning experience for Office 2016 applications. This initial look at SAM and the courses built for the instructors by Dr. Mahmud will take a topical approach, educating instructors on basic functions and features of SAM for both faculty and students. Additionally, we will discuss best practices when using SAM for both beginners and experienced users.

By:
Nicole Kucavich
August 13, 2018, 1:00 pm to 2:00 pm
Hall: 3306
The Significance of Internationalizing Classroom Instruction
 Attend Link

The Significance of Internationalizing Classroom Instruction

Internalization means different things to different people. This presentation will enable participants to discover a wide range of definitions and goals now encompassed by the term of internationalization. Participants will identify basic internationalized concepts to define, plan, and refine lesson plans and assessment methods. The presentation will broaden our knowledge of internationalization in order to better guide our colleges in developing innovative and effective strategies for curricular transformation.

By:
Brandon Nichols, Gail Gordon-Allen
August 13, 2018, 1:00 pm to 2:00 pm
Hall: 3305
Persistent Quizzing: It Seems to Work and It's a Lot of Work
 Attend Link

Persistent Quizzing: It Seems to Work and It's a Lot of Work

Research suggests that persistent, low-stakes quizzing significantly improves student learning. My own data analysis agrees with this suggestion; I will share data from sections of my statistics classes. I will show the results of difference of means tests for success rate data, grade distribution data, and attendance data.

By:
Andrew Kerr
August 13, 2018, 1:00 pm to 2:00 pm
Hall: 3207
         
2:00 pm           Administrators Lounge
 Attend Link

Administrators Lounge

By:
Registration / Check-In Staff
August 13, 2018, 2:00 pm to 3:00 pm
Hall: 1102
Brightspace Clinic
 Attend Link

Brightspace Clinic

By:
Registration / Check-In Staff
August 13, 2018, 2:00 pm to 3:00 pm
Hall: 1103
An Innovative Teaching Strategy: Joint Learning Community
 Attend Link

An Innovative Teaching Strategy: Joint Learning Community

In this presentation, we will present a modified joint learning between the classes of Microbiology and Anatomy and Physiology. The purpose of joint learning is that students can make connections immediately between two different courses for enhanced learning. Students can learn in a more diverse environment, promoting opportunities for culture responsive teaching and learning.

By:
Azmia Jeved, Minxiu Wang
August 13, 2018, 2:00 pm to 3:00 pm
Hall: 3200
Being Productive in a Reactive Classroom Environment: An Overview of Managing Conflict Using Emotional Intelligence and Trauma Informed Strategies to Improve Student Interactions and Success.
 Attend Link

Being Productive in a Reactive Classroom Environment: An Overview of Managing Conflict Using Emotional Intelligence and Trauma Informed Strategies to Improve Student Interactions and Success.

Although many children/adults experience a traumatic event, not all children/adults are traumatized. However, for some children/adults, the constant exposure to violence and trauma, can become locked into a permanent state of Fight/Flight and can cause reactions to normal experiences as if they were life and death threats, subsequently negatively impacting school performance. (Mendelson, Tandon, O'Brennan, Leaf, & Ialongo, 2015; West et al., 2014). During the semester, there will be traumatic situations that occur in and out of the classroom which has the potential to alter the learning environment, interrupt the learning process, or may lead to retaliatory violence in some cases. This session will highlight the challenges faculty face with students who present with residual trauma. Faculty will become familiar with strategies that can support students with these issues. Also, the workshop will highlight strategies that can support the development of a safe and nurturing learning environment for both the instructor and student.

By:
Celeste McGill
August 13, 2018, 2:00 pm to 3:00 pm
Hall: 3201
Facilitating Assignment Design Charrettes: Sharing Resources, Tools, and Practices
 Attend Link

Facilitating Assignment Design Charrettes: Sharing Resources, Tools, and Practices

Effective assessment, as we know from decades of experience, is not only about measurement; it is about building a culture of evidence and improvement. That means paying attention to the needs of stakeholders, especially faculty, and providing relevant support and development opportunities. Evidence from the work that students do in their courses is proving especially powerful for improving student learning but this is only true when the assignments and tasks that faculty require of students are clearly and explicitly aligned with designated learning outcomes. To facilitate tight alignment between assignments, evaluative criteria, and student learning, faculty are coming together collectively to work on assignment design. This session will feature current work happening around assignment design and highlight the ways that a focus on assignments as assessments can more deeply engage faculty and also strengthen student learning and success.

By:
Gianina Baker
August 13, 2018, 2:00 pm to 3:00 pm
Hall: 3203
Student Engagement with Internet Searches in Lectures
 Attend Link

Student Engagement with Internet Searches in Lectures

Students can increase their participation in lecture classes when they are encouraged to explore the topic using Internet searches. When the students have clear instructions for the search, they can quickly locate real-life examples or additional data and then contribute to the class discussion. Searches should be quick (30-90 seconds), fact-based (who/what/where/when), and relevant to the course topic or to student questions. Searches can be either team-based (different topics for each team) or apply to the overall class. It is critical that the instructor must be prepared with the appropriate search terms. This kind of guidance will train the student for lifelong learning, using the student's favorite technology. My examples are in biology, but the concepts of student engagement can apply to any discipline.

By:
Laurie Erikson
August 13, 2018, 2:00 pm to 3:00 pm
Hall: 3204
Global Resources for Teaching and Learning: What Do You Need?
 Attend Link

Global Resources for Teaching and Learning: What Do You Need?

For the past three years, international area studies centers from the University of Chicago (focusing on East Asia, East Europe, Russia/Eurasia, Latin America, and the Middle East) have been working with City Colleges to bring international resources to faculty and students. Our goal has been to support faculty efforts to internationalize courses, and we have been able to help integrate content in a variety of disciplines, from foreign language to anthropology to writing to microbiology to culinary arts. City Colleges faculty have attended professional development workshops at UChicago; we have found speakers for classes and public events; and journalists from the Pulitzer Center on Crisis Reporting have visited City Colleges campuses to talk about refugees, food waste, global health, metropolitan waterways, and immigration. This session will provide an overview of our programming, highlight how City Colleges faculty have utilized our resources, and ask attendees about their interests related to international content in their classrooms. What supports do faculty have for the integration of international topics? What barriers present challenges? We hope to get a sense of how we can support—and bolster—faculty interests and students’ global competency as we move into the next phase of our programming with City Colleges. We welcome suggestions to improve our partnership and plan for the future!

By:
Abbey Newman, Esther Peters, Natalie Arsenault, Thomas Maguire
August 13, 2018, 2:00 pm to 3:00 pm
Hall: 3205
Incorporating Virtual Reality in the Classroom
 Attend Link

Incorporating Virtual Reality in the Classroom

The 360 video or immersive video allows the watcher to view in every direction of the video. The viewer can view the video from a desktop or mobile device like watching a YouTube video. The 360 videos can also be viewed with virtual reality goggles for a more immersive experience. The presentation will discuss the best practice of using 360 videos in the face-to-face classroom environment to promote student discussion around key accounting topics. The students view and interact with the 360 videos and simultaneously answer instructor questions. The 360 videos also help to visually reinforce general business concepts.

By:
Mfon Akpan
August 13, 2018, 2:00 pm to 3:00 pm
Hall: 3300
Instructional Strategies for Student Success in All Classrooms
 Attend Link

Instructional Strategies for Student Success in All Classrooms

Being an organization focused on providing opportunities for students across the city of Chicago, each of our classrooms are filled with a diverse population of learners. As experts in our content areas, it is important that we couple of expertise with proven strategies for student success in Literacy and English. Participants will leave this workshop with a plethora of skills for improving student comprehension, vocabulary, fluency, and writing.

By:
Bozena Janiszewska, Evelyn Murdock, Gail Gordon-Allen, Janet Knapp-Caporale, Lavina Williams, Melloney Beck, Tatiana Uhoch
August 13, 2018, 2:00 pm to 3:00 pm
Hall: 3301
Mindfulness in the College Classroom
 Attend Link

Mindfulness in the College Classroom

Mindfulness in the Community College classroom has never been more important than it is today. Students come to the City Colleges of Chicago from a variety of backgrounds including an increased diversity of races, religions, economic statuses, ethnicities, ages, and gender perspectives, just to name a few of these multifarious life experiences and unique viewpoints. Moreover, faculty differ tremendously in their pedagogical approaches to teaching, coming from as equally diverse perspectives as our students. In many cases, students find themselves in situations in which they reflect upon themselves and their life experiences through the lens of self-criticism or lack, based on their internal dialogs. This, in turn, may impede the potential for a fully actualized educational experience within the City Colleges of Chicago. Utilizing mindfulness practices within the classroom may have the ability to assist students and faculty alike in becoming more in touch with their internal processes, which may allow for greater availability, concentration, and acceptance in the classroom environment.

By:
Cassandra Powell
August 13, 2018, 2:00 pm to 3:00 pm
Hall: 3302
Online Learning Courses: From Blackboard to Brightspace
 Attend Link

Online Learning Courses: From Blackboard to Brightspace

CCC will be making the transition from the current LMS, Blackboard, to Brightspace in the Spring 2019 semester. As an online instructor you may have questions or concerns about how your course will be migrated to Brightspace and steps you will need to take to prepare. This session will help ease some concerns and provide a roadmap for the process. This informational session will introduce online instructors to the course migration process in preparation for transition from Blackboard to Brightspace. The goal of this session is to provide online instructors with answers to questions about the migration process and tips for ensuring content transfers smoothly into the new system. Below are some of the questions that will be answered during this session. • When will my content need to be in Brightspace?
- How will my course be moved from Blackboard to Brightspace?
- What will my course look like in Brightspace?
- What won’t transfer from Blackboard to Brightspace?
- How will the checklist change when we begin using Brightspace?
- How can I best prepare my course and content for the move to Brightspace?
- Where can I get training on Brightspace?
- When and how can I get started?

By:
Selom Assignon, Steven Bradford
August 13, 2018, 2:00 pm to 3:00 pm
Hall: 3304
Reducing participation apprehension and increasing communication confidence in your classroom
 Attend Link

Reducing participation apprehension and increasing communication confidence in your classroom

Various individual, interpersonal, cultural and structural variables may impede or enhance classroom engagement and participation behaviors. This session provides a brief overview of the concepts of participation apprehension and public speaking apprehension then presents instructional strategies that cultivate supportive communication, increase student communication confidence, and stimulate authentic classroom participation. We’ll also explore ways to communicate your expectations for the quantity, quality, and dependability dimensions of classroom participation.

By:
Susan Colon
August 13, 2018, 2:00 pm to 3:00 pm
Hall: 3309
Scholarship and Grant Opportunities in STEM with the Illinois Space Grant Consortium
 Attend Link

Scholarship and Grant Opportunities in STEM with the Illinois Space Grant Consortium

In 2017, CCC was invited to join the Illinois Space Grant Consortium (ISGC). Through this organization, CCC faculty and students now have access to a suite of grant and scholarship funding opportunities for STEM research, teaching, and scholarships. This session will give an overview of the funding opportunities available, program deadlines, and institutional expectations.

By:
Phillip Vargas, Thomas Higgins
August 13, 2018, 2:00 pm to 3:00 pm
Hall: 3310
EEO & Title IX Essentials
 Attend Link

EEO & Title IX Essentials

What are faculty mandatory reporting obligations when they become aware of an incident of sexual harassment/violence? Are there exceptions to the mandatory reporting obligation? What are your Title IX and EEO rights as an employee of CCC? Get answers to these questions directly from the EEO Office. What are faculty mandatory reporting obligations when they become aware of an incident of sexual harassment/violence? Are there exceptions to the mandatory reporting obligation? What are your Title IX and EEO rights as an employee of CCC? Get answers to these questions directly from the EEO Office.

By:
Aaron Allen
August 13, 2018, 2:00 pm to 3:00 pm
Hall: 3311
The intersectionality between team building activities and professional learning communities
 Attend Link

The intersectionality between team building activities and professional learning communities

In this workshop, as the presenter, I will model showing respect to participants as a means of enhancing students’ confidence, as well as using team building activities to foster and promote professional learning communities, encourage and reinforce students’ motivation, positive attitude, and perceptions. Likewise, I will promote encouraging communication and participation early in the semester. Team building activities help students create connections and overcome the obstacles that frequently are present in traditional, direct instruction learning environments. The intersectionality between team building activities and professional learning communities encourage and nurture diversity, inclusion and respect between students. The purpose of this interactive workshop is to demonstrate that discourse and intentionality, using team building activities, fosters students’ intellectual curiosity and awareness of the commonality/similarities among students.

By:
Danny Shields
August 13, 2018, 2:00 pm to 3:00 pm
Hall: 4201
English 101 Eligibility Changes and the Impact on Other Disciplines
 Attend Link

English 101 Eligibility Changes and the Impact on Other Disciplines

Over the past two years, The English Discipline has made significant changes to its composition sequence district-wide. Some courses have been eliminated and others have been added to each college. Along with these changes, district office has chosen to enforce an existing procedure that has changed which students are 101 eligible. To help facilitate a necessary conversation around setting/changing pre-reqs and changing the existing procedures, English Faculty who have been directly involved in the restructuring of the course sequence and student placement will present information to aid in an informed, collaborative, decision-making process that will include stakeholders across the colleges and disciplines.

By:
Keith Sprewer
August 13, 2018, 2:00 pm to 3:00 pm
Hall: 4204
            Technology & Mathematics Education
 Attend Link

Technology & Mathematics Education

Participants will learn more the reasons behind technology adoption and some strategies based on previous research to help enhance the used of technology more effectively.

By:
Kawkab Alhejoj
August 13, 2018, 2:00 pm to 3:00 pm
Hall: 4200
Effective teaching guarantees effective learning
 Attend Link

Effective teaching guarantees effective learning

A student of science in the past and now an educator of science in present would like to relate effective teaching and learning to the introductory chapter of science as a away of learning by observation. Observation is an excellent strategy which makes the teacher focused and the learner attentive to look,listen,and finally excel with a connection to community. It is well said by J.C.Dana” who dares to teach must never cease to learn “. An expert in the field does not guarantee the status of a great educator for unless the educator has the ability to design and adjust to creating a student friendly teaching-learning class room atmosphere with the mission “no student left behind” yes, this can be possible if the teacher can instill learning competition in all the students in the course by implementing three words with the alphabet “I” . I-informed,I- interest,I- involved. The theory of biology with attached labs are no doubt are more complex and detested by many students.Hence awareness of their beauty is to be amplified in a way that it can be loved by even non-major students with clear and loud message to learn biology and a basic necessity for the health of personal and professional life.Besides these,the general rules of on-time and perfect attendance will allow the students to have continuity and in-depth understanding of the subject material leading to prolific success .

By:
Hamed Sarwar
August 13, 2018, 2:00 pm to 3:00 pm
Hall: 3206
          Teaching the Very Foreign: Central Asian history for building a knowledge and inquiry skills ladder
 Attend Link

Teaching the Very Foreign: Central Asian history for building a knowledge and inquiry skills ladder

Central Eurasia is far from the knowledge and experience of most college students, but weaving knowledge about various Central Eurasia-related topics into internationally-oriented coursework allows students to enhance their inquiry skills and to use engagement with very unfamiliar places and societies to build their ability to base analysis on new information. This talk will present several examples from Central Asia past and present: Russia’s conquest of Kazakh nomads; collectivization of Uzbek cotton growers; and present-day Kyrgyz bride kidnapping. The talk/discussion then turns toward enhancing students’ ability to ask questions that allow for deeper inquiry, and that begin to think through comparisons to more familiar topics that may help to ground an analysis of something very unfamiliar. The mode of presentation will start with a short lecture and then turn to group discussion and interaction for turning new cultural information into the basis for inquiry and analysis.

By:
Marianne Kamp
August 13, 2018, 2:00 pm to 3:00 pm
Hall: 4105
Seeing Beyond What Is Apparent: Critical Race Pedagogy
 Attend Link

Seeing Beyond What Is Apparent: Critical Race Pedagogy

The liberating and empowering effect of critical race pedagogy serves as a source of affirmation for historically marginalized students amplifying their voices in a way that validates the power and knowledge that lies within their lived experiences. As educators, we must value the cultural depths of students as a source of knowledge. To truly transform the lives of students, educators must aid in the development of students’ critical consciousness. When Students of Color understand the ways in which larger forces oppress them and their communities, they can begin to engage in social action with the goal of equitable education for all. The Kuona Process is just one of the tools that educators can utilize to help students critically think, feel, and to see beyond what its apparent (Peavy, 2000).

By:
Caress Brown
August 13, 2018, 2:00 pm to 3:00 pm
Hall: 4104
  TurnItIn Updates and Enhancements
 Attend Link

TurnItIn Updates and Enhancements

Join Turnitin to discuss the upcoming enhancements to the integration with D2L including dashboard updates, pushing grades to the D2L gradebook, and conducting peer reviews using PeerMark within D2L.

By:
Stephanie Stocks
August 13, 2018, 2:00 pm to 3:00 pm
Hall: 3308
How To Build a Course In 10 Minutes and Course Conversion
 Attend Link

How To Build a Course In 10 Minutes and Course Conversion

While this session itself isn’t ten minutes, what you will learn can certainly be accomplished that quickly! During our time, we will look at the quick and easy ways to add content to your course, build a small quiz, set up your gradebook, and more! In addition, we’ll explore the workflow of adding and tweaking existing material brought over from other sources like Blackboard and content providers.

By:
Sean Fitzgibbons
August 13, 2018, 2:00 pm to 3:00 pm
Hall: 3307
  Orientation and Updates to the Faculty Council Of the City Colleges Of Chicago (FC4)
 Attend Link

Orientation and Updates to the Faculty Council Of the City Colleges Of Chicago (FC4)

Come meet the district Faculty Council leadership. Hear some of our goals and help us set a plan for the coming year. ALL FACULTY ARE WELCOME.

By:
Jennifer Alexander, Jessica Bader
August 13, 2018, 2:00 pm to 3:00 pm
Hall: 3305
Guided by Love, Curating Community: Insurgent Teaching Practices in the Urban Borderlands
 Attend Link

Guided by Love, Curating Community: Insurgent Teaching Practices in the Urban Borderlands

Urban community colleges often create microcosms of the power structures and “critical mapmaking” of global capitalism (Alexander 92). Teaching and learning in these borderland spaces – often rendered invisible within hierarchies of higher education and especially vulnerable to corporatizing – crystallize the embodied experiences of interlocking oppressions. Crossing numerous boundaries to sit in community with “intimate others”, our students’ engagement with “theory” is not abstract (hooks 163). They live and breathe the traumas, joys and resistances analyzed by intersectional feminisms, as they claim their voices/spaces as scholars, artists, caregivers, professionals, and activists – in and out of “academia.” “To be guided by love is to live in community with all life,” bell hooks reminds us. “…learning to live in community must be a core practice for all of us who desire spirituality in education” (163). Transformative teaching with love allows justice-oriented students and educators to imagine, model, self-curate, acquire and use vital tools for insurgent practice. “The struggle has always been inner… Nothing happens in the ‘real’ world unless it first happens in the images in our heads” (Anzaldúa 109). These colleagues will share stories of teaching/administrating to “bridge the sense of otherness” (hooks 162). They aim to avoid, as Audre Lorde wrote, being “crunched into other people’s fantasies for me and eaten alive” (137). Presenters include strategies for building community, forming intimacy across power lines, resisting institutional attacks, practicing critical analysis of “underneath histories” (Joyner 11), healing from trauma, and, ultimately, using joy and love as radical methods.

By:
Amanda Loos, Asif Wilson, Carrie Nepstad, Janina Cartier, Jen Wilson, Rosie L. Banks
August 13, 2018, 2:00 pm to 3:00 pm
Hall: 3207
      Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr: 50 Years After His Assassination, Teaching and Learning His Legacy In The Twenty-First Century
 Attend Link

Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr: 50 Years After His Assassination, Teaching and Learning His Legacy In The Twenty-First Century

The essential purpose of this session is to help expand pedagogy and learning about Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr’s impact on contemporary American culture and history fifty years after his assassination.

By:
Curtis Keyes, Jr.
August 13, 2018, 2:00 pm to 3:00 pm
Hall: 4203
 
3:00 pm       Local 1600 Union Update
 Attend Link

Local 1600 Union Update

By:
Tony Johnston
August 13, 2018, 3:00 pm to 4:00 pm
Hall: 1104 Auditorium
                                                                                     

Legend

 Break